Rib Thicknessing: Scraping Planes

One option for taking down the thickness of ribs prior to bending is a scraping plane.  I was taught to use a low angle block plane to reduce rib thickness and added a few passes with a Lee Valley Scraping plane for final finishing of ribs.  The is a perfectly valid method and works provided that the plane is super sharp and the cutting depth is kept very small.  The downside is that it’s a slow process if your ribs are thick, due to the need to keep the cutting depth small.  Two ways to improve the amount of material taken with each pass include using a toothed blade or increasing the blade bevel angle.  Another option is a Scraping Plane with a toothed blade set at 70 to 90 degrees, or a York/Pitch plane with a blade set at about 50 degrees.

I have been researching traditional Japanese planesDai Noshi and became aware of  Sole Flattening planes (Dai Naoshi) which are traditionally used to adjust the soles of wooden Japanese planes.  For the interested, the soles of Japanese wooden planes are not flat, but are relieved in front of the blade and behind the blade leaving three or four contact points.  Also worth noting is the use of tapered laminated steel blades and specially shaped chip breakers in Japanese planes. Traditional Japanese joinery is amazing, check out this video.  For our purposes, the Dai Naoshi form is a useful model for a scraping planes for rib thicknessing and is a tool easily in reach of the construction skills of a violin maker.

While I was pondering a new plane to speed up my rib thicknessing, I saw Davide Sora’s video on rib thicknessing.  He uses a toothing plane with a toothed blade set at about 90 degrees.  Check out his use of the plane here.  Given his success I decided to build one of my own.

Here is my version.  Using separate sides makes it a quick build.  In my design the wedge goes behind the blade, while a wedge is not usually included in Japanese Dai Naoshi because it has a wedge shaped blade, it is necessary here as my blade is flat.  The dimensions of my plane were roughly based on the recommendations of this post.

Scraping Plane

I’ll keep you posted on how well it works.

2 responses

  1. Hello Stephen!

    It’s Jennifer here! I love reading your blog and it’s always filled with very interesting info.

    I’ve been looking for a scraping plane as well because I find using a scraper takes too much time if the rib is thick, and using a block plane sometimes tears the wood! Where did you get the toothed blade? What kind of wood did you use for the plane? And what tool do you use to make sure that the sole is completely flat?

    Thanks!

    • Hi Jennifer, I bought my toothed plane from Lee Valley, they have a variety of sizes, mine is a 2″ fine tooth (05P25.07). The wood for the plane is maple, I bought maple dimensional lumber and laminated it for the thickness, then used bubinga from Lee Valley for the sides. I just used my block plane and an engineer square to make fare up the plane after it was glued up. Another alternative is to get a toothed blade for your block plane. Cheers!

Let me know what you think...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: